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This is the point of the movie where the hero gets that last bit of information that gives them the strength to overthrow the villain. They own their weakness and turn it into a strength.

Raquel Welch in Hannie Caulder. Picture from Movie Ramblings.

Raquel Welch in Hannie Caulder. Picture from Movie Ramblings.

I asked everything I believe in, “Should I stick to my guns or reinvent myself?”

I heard it’s a little bit of both. It’s no long apologizing for your gun, sheepishly tipping it from you hip, pretending it’s this pea shooter and you don’t know how to use it.

It’s admitting you have a 3030 and you’re a flipping sharp shooter. You know how to use it. You’re not afraid to use it because it’s natural, second nature. It is your unique strength.

Marlin 336W in 3030 Winchester. Picture from Wikipedia.

Marlin 336W in 3030 Winchester. Picture from Wikipedia.

It’s locking and loading. It’s whatever firearm they give you, knowing you know how to use it. It’s as simple as point and shoot and also not. You know that, respect it and that’s what makes you good.

Quite pretending you’re the parson when you’re the sheriff. Just own the fact you’re the bandit, the one who rides in and people look at a little scared.

Kate Beckett (Stana Katic) in black. See? Not a bad thing at all. don't own at all. no copyright intended.

Kate Beckett (Stana Katic) in black. See? Not a bad thing at all. don’t own at all. no copyright intended.

You think you wear white but maybe you wear black. Not a bad thing.

See your brilliance, your badassery. Fighting for the right that is yours inherently, this light, this life force. Standing there in the dust, alone or people behind you. Some believe in you, some you’re their champion/protector. Stand there as the wind blows and face your foil, you. The sun spreads its arms over the both of you, welcoming, blessing, holding, until the arms drop and you draw.

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